January 6, 2013

February 28, 2012
If you like your public art with a dash of neon and a sci-fi aesthetic, then you’ll like what multimedia designers LuftWerk have done to Anish Kapoor‘s Cloud Gate sculpture (nicknamed The Bean), which resides in Chicago’s Millennium Park. This shiny alien bean consists of 168 stainless steel plates that gleam out at the citizens of the Windy City. It looks like the sort of structure that, if you prod it, will make some hydraulic hisses before opening up and firing plasma bolts onto fleeing humans. That being the case, it’s the perfect canvas for LuftWerk to project a light and sound installation, which they’ve called Luminous Field, turning this Cloud Gate into a visual effect from Close Encounters of the Third Kind. The neon geometric forms and colored grids were created using 10 projectors that were used to generate the visual feast, set to music by Owen Clayton Condon of Third Coast Percussion. Because of the highly polished, liquid mercury appearance of the sculpture, the light show turns it into something that looks like a star gate to another dimension. This extraterrestrial installation runs until February 20th. (via LuftWerk’s Luminous Field Lights Up Anish Kapoor’s Cloud Gate | The Creators Project)

If you like your public art with a dash of neon and a sci-fi aesthetic, then you’ll like what multimedia designers LuftWerk have done to Anish Kapoor‘s Cloud Gate sculpture (nicknamed The Bean), which resides in Chicago’s Millennium Park. This shiny alien bean consists of 168 stainless steel plates that gleam out at the citizens of the Windy City. It looks like the sort of structure that, if you prod it, will make some hydraulic hisses before opening up and firing plasma bolts onto fleeing humans. That being the case, it’s the perfect canvas for LuftWerk to project a light and sound installation, which they’ve called Luminous Field, turning this Cloud Gate into a visual effect from Close Encounters of the Third Kind. The neon geometric forms and colored grids were created using 10 projectors that were used to generate the visual feast, set to music by Owen Clayton Condon of Third Coast Percussion. Because of the highly polished, liquid mercury appearance of the sculpture, the light show turns it into something that looks like a star gate to another dimension. This extraterrestrial installation runs until February 20th. (via LuftWerk’s Luminous Field Lights Up Anish Kapoor’s Cloud Gate | The Creators Project)

February 24, 2012
ericiam:

The Stargazers by Kiddi Kristjáns on Flickr.
The Stargazers Went on a trip recently with ArnarBergur and Ottó - we got real lucky that night, the stars were brighter than ever and we saw multiple shooting stars, I even captured a few! If we had moonlight or a little bit of snow, it would haven been perfect. You need some ambient lighting for the ground, otherwise it’ll be pitch black, even though you’re shooting at 30seconds. Zeiss F-Distagon 2.8/16 - 15 seconds@f/2.8 , ISO6400 (distortion corrected) Flickr Explore #1 - October 11th 2010, woohoo!

ericiam:

The Stargazers by Kiddi Kristjáns on Flickr.

The Stargazers

Went on a trip recently with ArnarBergur and Ottó - we got real lucky that night, the stars were brighter than ever and we saw multiple shooting stars, I even captured a few! If we had moonlight or a little bit of snow, it would haven been perfect. You need some ambient lighting for the ground, otherwise it’ll be pitch black, even though you’re shooting at 30seconds.

Zeiss F-Distagon 2.8/16 - 15 seconds@f/2.8 , ISO6400 (distortion corrected)

Flickr Explore #1 - October 11th 2010, woohoo!

(via ericiam-deactivated20140218)

February 23, 2012
lomographicsociety:

Lomography Film of the Day - Lomography 400 CN
Get it online!

lomographicsociety:

Lomography Film of the Day - Lomography 400 CN

Get it online!

February 22, 2012

February 20, 2012
Northern lights and volcanoes in Iceland captured by British photographertelegraph.co.uk

Northern lights and volcanoes in Iceland captured by British photographer
telegraph.co.uk

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